Growing Dill Sprouts

Growing Dill Sprouts

Sprouting

I hesitate to add this, as I am concerned it will just confuse you, but I'm so into full disclosure that I opted to include this: Light may help Dill germinate. The problem with using bright light is that it dries out your seeds/sprouts. Since Dill uses so little water during sprouting, it is possible that it would get too dry to sprout. Frankly, I just don't know - yet. I've been too busy with all our regular sprout work to sprout Dill of lately - So, until I can replace this text with authoritative text, you'll have to experiment on your own. It's not like you have to. Our instructions work well, but if you like to experiment, you may find you can get the Dill sprouting sooner. When I get to experimenting again, I'll even be trying direct sunlight. In nature Dill often grows wild. My guess is that some Dill farmers even let it re-seed itself - as opposed to planting new seed manually every year. All plants grow seeds. If left unharvested those seeds will fall to the ground. Most seeds work their way into the soil with the help of the freezing and thawing which causes the ground to heave and retract through the fall, winter and early spring. In the case of Dill, the seeds are so exceptionally light, that they will mostly stay atop the ground over winter. Dill grows so prolifically that it is my conclusion, that light may help them germinate. Maybe I'm wrong. I'll tell you as soon as I know. I love learning about seeds - and just about anything else for that matter.

My First Time

I tried sprouting Dill straight, back in 1993 or 94. I soaked it - then rinsed it twice a day for 2 weeks. Nothing. Back in those days we grew all of our sprouts outside - near our well. It was a partially shaded area, but it had direct sunlight for a good part of the day. I got fed up with the Dill, so I put it aside. Normally I cleaned up after every crop, but the Dill was sitting in small tray (we grew everything in standard nursery trays back then), so I just shoved it to a little used spot. I left the tray uncovered and untended for another week or two (I forget). At some point I noticed the tray. It was full of sprouts! It had gone at least a full week without water, and had been sitting in a bright spot. The wind didn't dry it to death, the sun didn't either. It sprouted! We found its flavor to be hot. Since we didn't like it, we didn't grow it straight again for 15 years. We have found that its flavor will change to the dill-weed-flavor we want. Our instructions are derived from the method that produced the flavor we wanted. They were also inspired by that ancient forgotten crop. Once again, a lesson was learned from failure.

Micro-Greens Note:

You can also grow Dill as a Micro-Green. To do so, follow the instructions on our Celery Greens page.

Your Dill is going to look like this for quite a while.

Your Dill will show some signs of germination in about 2 weeks - assuming you are following our instructions - just over there, on the right -->

Once Dill germinates, it will grow faster - well - faster than it has up 'til now....

This is what we see around day 17-19.

Hope to see this at about 21 days.

Family: Umbelliferae
Genus: Anethum
Species: graveolens
Cultivar: Bouquet