Growing Long Life Micro-Greens

Sprouting Directions

  • Soak No
  • Rinse / Drain No
  • Plant Day 1
  • Harvest 7 - 14 days

Broccoli, Red & Green Cabbage, Daikon Radish, Mustard, Arugula, Cress, Mizuna &
Tatsoi


Many Brassicas come together beautifully in a symbiotic blend of delicious nutrition! Research has shown that antioxidant content can increase when certain sprouts grow together. We base our mixes on taste, texture and growth rate for the most part, but we considered "science" too, when we made this mix up.


All of the seeds in Long Life Mix come from sources which are certified organic.

These same seeds grow Nutritiously Delicious Sprouts too.

Note: We sell Long Life Mix by the 1/2 pound.

Growing Instructions

Yields approximately three times as many Micro-Greens (by weight) as seed "planted"
We put quotes around Planted because the seeds are spread atop a medium - not planted under.

Planting

PLEASE read the contents of Notes Tab (to the right)
for variations and a whole lot more information.

Grow these on the ultimate medium -
Coconut Coir, soil, or a soilless medium like Baby Blanket, in a Compostable Tray - or for bigger crops you can use a 10x20 Tray, or another of our Growing Trays.
Or - our lovely and versatile Stainless Steel Sprouter - or grow them upon a flat Hemp Bag, or in our gorgeous Euro-Sprouter.

I know - too many choices. That's our biggest problem here at Sproutpeople. Choices!
So I'm going to tell you the way I (who has every possible option available) grow Micros.
I always use Coconut Coir!
I mix Earthworm Castings into my Coconut Coir for added nitrogen (which is very good for green plant growth), at a rate of 25% Castings to 75% Coconut Coir.
I grow in our Compostable Tray if I am going for Cotyledons (the first leaves), or
a 5x5 Nursery Tray or our wonderful Stainless Steel Sprouter if I want True Leaves.
The Nursery Tray and Stainless Steel Sprouter are deeper - which gives the roots more room to grow - so the plants can grow bigger more easily.

Thoroughly moisten the Medium upon which you are going to grow.

Measure your seed
For a thick crop of Cotyledon (first leaf) Micro-Greens plant the larger amount. For bigger, True Leaf Micros plant the smaller amount.
Compostable Tray = 1 tsp. - 2 tsp.
5x5 Nursery Tray = 1 tsp. - 2 tsp.
Stainless Steel Sprouter = 2 tsp. - 4 tsp.
10x10 Tray = 1 - 2 Tbs.
10x20 Tray = 2 - 4 Tbs.
Hemp Bag = 2 - 4 tsp.
Euro-Sprouter = 1 - 2 tsp.
If you are going for True Leaves you really must use a Growing Tray that is at least 2 inches deep - like our 5x5, 10x10, or 10x20 inch Nursery Trays.

Spread seeds as evenly as you can - all over your thoroughly moistened Medium.

Cover your crop: If you're planting in a 5x5 Tray use another identical tray - up side down. Same thing with other Trays. If using a Compostable Tray snap the clear lid on for the first 2-3 days. If using a Hemp Bag, or another medium - be creative. If it's on a plate then use an identical plate (upside down) as a cover. For the Euro-Sprouter - use the cover that comes with it. It is not mandatory when growing Micro-Greens to cover them at all. Experiment for yourself and see what works best in your climate/location. I cover.

Place your Micro-Garden in a low-light, room temperature location (70° is optimal).

Growing and Greening

Once germination occurs - keep the medium moist by watering gently or misting with a Spray Bottle every day or three. The deal with watering is that the deeper your medium, the less you need to water, and the plants won't require a lot of water until they get growing big - at which point you may need to drench the medium every day. When using our Compostable Tray (which has no drainage) you can pour off excess water by tipping it.

Note: These wonderful little Brassica plants have a unique root structure. Brassicas will show microscopic roots starting on day 2 or 3. They are called root hairs and are most visible just before watering - when the plants are at their driest. These root hairs impress many people as mold - but they are not. When you water your crop the root hairs collapse back against the tap root. Viola! No root hairs! Now you know. Isn't learning fun?!

When your plants grow up and begin to shed their hulls they are ready for light so move them (if necessary) to a well lighted location. If you go with sunlight - water more frequently. Room light will usually do quite nicely - and will not dry out your medium as quickly. One consideration here - if you are going for True Leaves you should definitely use sunlight in a warm place.
The most beautiful Micro-Greens we have ever seen were grown in a greenhouse in Burlington, Vermont (in summer) by our friends Spencer and Mara at Half-Pint Farm. Just had to mention that. They taught me and Lori a lot!

Keep the medium moist by watering regularly. Water from the side if possible to prevent injuring the tiny plants.

When your plants have open leaves which are green, they are done - unless you're going for True Leaves, in which case you need to keep watering and tending for another week or more.

Harvest

Cut the plants just above the medium upon which they have grown. During the final 8-12 hours minimize the surface moisture of your plants - they will store best in your refrigerator if they are dry to the touch. So if you water try to keep the water off the plants - just water the medium.

When you are ready to store them (I'll remind you that these degrade fairly quickly, so eat them instead of storing them if you can), if they are still damp - lay them between some paper towels or anything you prefer, and dry them very gently. Transfer your crop to a plastic bag or the sealed container of your choice - glass is good. We sell an amazing Produce Storage Bag that actually extends the shelf life of produce, if you're interested in the best of the best =;-) Whatever you store them in; put them in your refrigerator - if you must.

Great Job Sprout farmer!

Print Instructions

Video Notes

Sproutpeople and Micro-Greens

We first grew Micro-Greens back in 1994. We were way ahead of the curve. Nobody was interested in them - not our farmers market customers, not our food stores (co-ops, natural food stores and grocery stores we delivered to every week), not our restaurants, nobody! That did change some as the years passed, but we were always Sprout People first. Frankly, we prefer Sprouts to Micros because we find them plumper and more texturally pleasing -  but we keep working with them.  Some seeds (especially mucilaginous seeds)  won't grow as sprouts and Micro-Greens are SO gorgeous and offer a lot of unique and really cool possibilities.

Soaking and Pre-Sprouting

Though our instructions (in the Growing Instructions Tab - to the left) suggest these steps (for non-mucilaginous seeds), we have found them less and less necessary as we've worked with Micro-Greens.
We skip both now, concentrating first on thoroughly moistening our medium.  We then plant the seeds (which are just spread atop that thoroughly moistened medium),  and mist them with a Spray Bottle.  We then cover our planted seeds.  We mist them with a Spray Bottle at least once a day until they sprout, and then bury their roots  in the medium.  During those first 2-3 days we are misting heavily, to keep the medium thoroughly moist as well as the seeds.
We uncover the plants at different stages, depending on what we are doing with a particular crop.  Keep reading to learn more.

Fertilizing Micro-Greens

When growing on a soilless medium like Baby Blanket or  Tencel STG Pads it is advisable to use Liquid Kelp Feritlizer to give your plants  additional nutrients to draw upon.  When we use Kelp we dilute 1 tsp. in 1 quart of water (this is a higher concentration than the product label calls for).  We use it in a Spray Bottle or by watering the medium directly.  We use it every time we water.  The perfect container for these soilless mediums is our inexpensive Compostable Tray.

If you plant on soil - or better yet with Coconut Coir (our FAVorite), mix in 25% Earthworm Castings  for the ultimate nutrient rich, moisture retaining planting medium.  Mix them together thoroughly before moistening.

Micro-Green Variations

There are varying opinions of what constitutes a Micro-Green.  Traditionally it is just a plant grown to the Cotyledon (first leaf) stage, and cut above the medium upon which it is planted.
When we grow to this stage; we either grow on Baby Blanket, soil (any kind will do) , or our new favorite -  Coconut Coir.  Baby Blanket is less messy and works fine and dandy.  We cut a piece to fit a  plate, then  we follow our own instructions for keeping the medium and seeds-sprouts thoroughly moist.  We use another of the same size plate - inverted - as a cover.  We uncover our plants when they are about 1/2 inch tall, or when they are hitting the covering plate.   We then expose them to all the light our kitchen has to offer.  We even use direct sunlight when available.  We have to water them more often when we do this.  When it comes to watering, We mist them with a Spray Bottle until the seeds have firmly rooted.  After that -  when growing on a piece of  Baby Blanket on a plate; pour water directly onto the plate.  We gently tip and turn the plate so as much water as possible gets soaked up by the Baby Blanket, and then pour off most of the excess.
When growing on soil or  Coconut Coir; we continue to spray with the Spray Bottle, but we keep the medium moist by adding water directly to the plate or solid tray it is sitting on.   We allow the medium to drink up what water it can, and then gently pour off the excess.  Leaving a little water on the plate is fine - it will get sucked up before your next watering.  If it doesn't, you are leaving too much water behind.

There are some nowadays who want a Micro-Green to be a plant which puts out a True Leaf before they'll call it a Micro-Green.   We find that concept Very interesting, so we have worked to make that happen.

True Leaves

The first thing is to plant less seed.  Just how much is the question.  The general rule is this: The more space your plant has to grow roots - the bigger it can grow.
We are currently using 1/4 teaspoon in a 5x5 inch tray.  That leaves quite a bit of room between the seeds-plants, but gives them enough space to grow to the True Leaf stage.  This can take 2 weeks or more.   The main thing that is needed is More Light.  Plants get "leggy" when they need to reach for light.  We use that to our advantage in all other circumstances in the Sprout World, but here we want to minimize the legginess of the plants.  If you can put a light right above your crop -  or keep it in direct sunlight, that will help.  Keep everything adequately moist. Remember - the more light the faster the medium and plants will dry.  This may sound like a lot more work, but really it isn't much more than usual.
We cover the seeds only until they have sprouted when growing this way.  We plant on Coconut Coir (which hold moisture like nothing else we've ever worked with)  enriched with 25% Earthworm Castings, which add nitrogen that a plant uses to grow leaves.  When making up the mix,  do not exceed 25% Earthworm Castings as too much nitrogen can burn your plants (they actually whither and die when the soil is too "hot" - which means it has too much nitrogen).   Mix the castings into the base  Coconut Coir, or soil (any kind will work, though we do not advise mixes that are heavily peat moss as we find it hard to work with and we don't find the crop turns out as well) - it is the roots that will need access to the rich medium.
If growing a mix, not all of the plants will grow True Leaves at the same time.  Keep growing until most have them.  Harvest then and eat them up.  Though you can store Micro-Greens,  they degrade quickly, and since you have put so much work in these - you should enjoy them at their peak.

The Next Variation

The next obvious step (to us anyway) we find really exciting.  It is to grow even fewer seeds into even fewer plants.  Those plants will grow more leaves.  They will be more like Baby-Greens than Micro-Greens.  They will require more time. They may re-grow more quickly because they'll have a bigger root-mass. The container (tray, pot, etc.) they grow in will likely be too small for that root-mass to live long, but it's possible.  When it comes right down to it, we're talking about an indoor-garden.  All the other stuff we offer is about indoor gardening, but this is more like a garden.  Not many of us have space in our homes to Garden inside, but we love the idea.  We're working on this, and we'll tell you what we find out as soon as we know something.  It was gardening that eventually led us to sprouting.  We feel like this is closing that circle started so long ago - now it is sprouting leading back to gardening @:-)  Start with Coconut Coir enriched with Earthworm Castings and you'll have a  great experience.  Happy Micro-Greening!

Images

8 wonderful Brassicas planted atop the perfect Medium: 60% Coconut Coir, 20% Earthworm Castings, and 20% Vermiculite.

Start by thoroughly moistening the medium. Thoroughly moist means saturated but not dripping. Proceed by spreading your seed evenly (don't sweat this - just do your best) across the medium. Cover with whatever makes sense. It depends on what you're growing in.

12 hours later...
If we look closely we are already seeing germination

12 hours later...
This closer view shows that here is now a lot of germination happening.

12 hours later....
The fuzzy stuff you see is Not mold - those are Root Hairs - microscopic roots which grow off the tap (main) root. They are good. They are beautiful. If you have a magnifying glass, take a look. When we see Root Hairs on sprouts they disappear after Rinsing because the water makes them fall back along the tap root. Since we are not watering our Micros they stay visible. If you were to water now they would vanish. Enjoy them.

12 hours later...
Besides those amazing root hairs we can now see leaves. They are yellow, but there are already enough of them to give our Micros light, so uncover your crop and move it to a well lit location.

12 hours later...
Photosynthesis happens!

12 hours later....
Amazing plants full of amazing potential growing amazingly fast.
When I say potential this is what I mean: In nature, each of these seeds would grow into huge plants which would produce thousands of seeds. Each seed produces thousands of seeds! Is it any wonder that these crops are so packed with nutrition?!

Another view of our crop at the same time.

12 hours later....
There are 8 different kinds of seed in here, remember? The big one in front is a Radish. The little purple ones are Red Cabbage. We can now see that some grow faster than others, but that's fine and dandy in this case. Everything is growing wonderfully.

12 hours later....

12 hours later....

12 hours later....

12 hours later....
Harvest now - if you haven't already given in to temptation.
All you need do is cut them near the Medium.

Same time....
The tallest ones are Radishes, but everyone is pretty tall now.

Taxonomy
Family: Brassicaceae/ Cruciferae
Genus: Brassica
Species: various
Cultivar: various
$23.32 1/2 lb.
1/2 lb.
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